Osso VR: Foundations of Practice Tutorial

Overview

­­Trying virtual reality for the first time can be frustrating for users who aren’t acclimated or used to the Oculus Touch Controllers hardware. The Osso VR: Foundations of Practice Tutorial is a virtual reality training simulation that onboards a new Osso VR user, minimizing their initial frustration by taking them through training scenarios.

I interviewed target users, created a user journey map, story-boarded the tutorial experience, gathered feedback, and iterated on the design to improve it for the 2019 conference.

The tutorial was used at the 2018 American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeon’s (AAOS) Conference and then updated and used at the 2019 AAOS Conference. The tutorial is currently shipped to customers to help onboard first time Osso VR users. The creation of this tutorial has improved the user experience and as a result has helped to retain and increase the number of customers using Osso VR.

Target Audience

First time Osso VR users

Programs Used

Adobe Illustrator, Unity, Google Slides

My Role

Project Lead and UX Designer


The Design Process

Defining the Problem

Through demos at conferences, first time Osso VR users struggled with the virtual reality software and hardware, resulting in a less than optimal first experience. As a result, a tutorial was created.

User Journey Map

To capture a first time user’s demo experience and to align the internal product team on work items, a user journey map was created.

General User Journey - taking into consideration what motivates a user, how the overall experience is, and areas of opportunity to improve the experience. This overview helps to capture the experience and identify the users’ need for a tutorial.

General User Journey - taking into consideration what motivates a user, how the overall experience is, and areas of opportunity to improve the experience. This overview helps to capture the experience and identify the users’ need for a tutorial.

Storyboarding

The tutorial was broken into 3 parts:

  1. How to use the Oculus touch controllers (hardware)

  2. How to interact with objects in the operating room (OR) to successfully complete an Osso VR technique

  3. Applying what was learned by working through a segment of an actual Osso VR technique

Part 1: Introduction to the controllers

Design Considerations/Thought Process:

Based on demo observations and reviewing psychology research, essential environmental and interaction decisions were made to introduce users to the VR hardware. Environmental and Interaction Decisions included:

  • Give the user time to adjust to the 3d world of VR

    • Start with a simple grayed out operating room (OR) to draw focus to the controllers and to not overwhelm the user

  • Overlay oculus controllers over a users hands in VR so they can associate the physical controllers with this new world more easily

  • Use visual cues, haptics, and auditory cues to help reinforce where the user should look and press to successfully complete the first part of the tutorial

  • Fade the scene to white and transition to a colored OR scene with gloved hands (overlaid Oculus controllers disappear) This will draw a distinction between the two parts of the tutorial

Below is a high fidelity storyboard of Part 1 of the tutorial for the 2018 AAOS Conference

Partial Storyboard from Part 1 of Original Osso VR Tutorial

Partial Storyboard from Part 1 of Original Osso VR Tutorial

Part 2 and Part 3: Interacting with objects and instruments in a simple OR setting and completing a portion of an Osso VR simulation.

Design Considerations/Thought Process:

Environmental and interaction decisions were made to introduce users to interacting with instruments and successfully completing a portion of the Osso VR experience. Environmental and Interaction Decisions included:

  • The white scene fades to the OR, but this time with color and more detail (slowly ramping users up for the full immersion)

  • Users are introduced to gloved hands without controllers overlaid

  • Users are taught how to pick up, drill, and twist objects using the triggers and buttons they were introduced to in part 1 of the tutorial

  • Between the simple OR and the complex OR continue with the white scene fade to indicate a switch of environments.

Feedback

The tutorial was attached to our Osso demo and presented at the 2018 American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. Some of the feedback included:

  • Adding the ability to pass between two hands in VR

  • Users continue to have problems differentiating between the different triggers

  • Users seem to be confused by the copy/terminology when referring to the triggers as buttons. Think of buttons as those on top of the controller.

As part of our follow up we created an updated Osso VR tutorial to be used at the 2019 AAOS Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Storyboard for new tutorial

The new tutorial for the 2019 AAOS conference in Las Vegas, Nevada incorporated the feedback from the previous AAOS conference. Below is the first page of the storyboard for the new tutorial. It was attached to our updated Osso demo. The updated tutorial was designed in 1 week due to competing design needs on other projects and the need to be ready for development at the start of the 2019 new year.

Page 1 of the new tutorial for 2019 AAOS conference

Page 1 of the new tutorial for 2019 AAOS conference

Outcome

The tutorial was well received at the 2019 AAOS Conference. Several work items came out of the event, but far fewer crucial changes compared to work following the 2018 AAOS Conference. The tutorial is currently used in Osso VR’s demo experience shown to potential customers as well helping current customers to successfully on board with Osso’s content.

Lessons Learned

  • The tutorial wasn’t evaluated by design until the very end of production, which led to quick semi-risky changes by technical artists prior to delivery. To avoid this situation in the future, it’s important that the tutorial be evaluated by design as soon as possible even before the entire thing is fully functioning in VR.

  • The timeline for the tutorial was continually pushed back due to other priorities, because we didn’t have check points and deadlines set from the get-go, resulting in crunched deadlines. To avoid this situation in the future, continually checking in with the team and creating check points and deadlines is key.